Gillette Ad Toxic Masculinity Youtube

I shared that article on my blog Facebook page, and then spent the next 24 hours fielding insults that basically confirmed just how prevalent toxic. The ad isn't criticizing people simply for being male. On this week’s. People are threatening to boycott Gillette after new ad sexual harassment and toxic masculinity. The ad — or rather, social messaging statement, since it doesn't actually include razors — starts with a series of images depicting boys and men bullying. Gillette, a company that sells razors, triggered a slew of right wing celebrities on social media yesterday with an advertisement featuring a new take on its old “the best a man can get” slogan. Everywhere. Opinion by: Stephanie H. I liked this article on the video from the Scary Mommy blog. #ToxicMasculinity and #Gillette. The new "Toxic Masculinity" ads are only running in their US markets. Jan 15, 2019 · Gillette ad takes on 'toxic masculinity' in #MeToo-era rebrand, provoking a backlash By early Tuesday, the video had about 223,000 downvotes on YouTube, compared with about 25,000. The razor company's short film, called Believe, plays on their famous slogan "The. As of writing this article, the ad has reached a stunning 934,000 dislikes in just a few days. Gillette's #MeToo-themed ad has sparked controversy — but this isn't the first time this has happened to a brand. And always clean-shaven. Gillette ad on ‘toxic masculinity’ stirs. Gillette's provocative new ad encouraging men to fight toxic masculinity has sparked a backlash. Somewhat confusingly however, toxic masculinity theory has itself gone ‘hegemonic’. from men who. Gillette's ad on toxic masculinity: A social and marketing disaster. Bullying, inadequate flirting, acting horny, making bad excuses are all very bad, but they're not directly caused by toxic masculinity, nor are they exclusive to male. I am going to step into this whole toxic male thing just to say this:. ” The video features footage of men in various situations — from fighting fires to hugging their children — while the company’s founder, Ilan Srulovicz, narrates. " As of the time of writing, the video has 165,000 likes and 492,000 dislikes on YouTube. Some called it courageous and much-needed. Gillette ad about 'toxic mascuilinity' sparks backlash among angry men (Photo: YouTube). For those who applaud the commercial, it may appear strange that its seemingly positive message. 2) We hear this message everywhere against 'toxic masculinity'. Bian: Gillette ad about toxic masculinity was more than necessary. On January 13, Gillette released a new ad that takes the company's 30-year-old slogan, "The Best a Man Can Get," and turns it into an introspective reflection on toxic masculinity very much. youtube/Gillette. Why aren't we surprised? + Twitter, Twitter Reactions, Social Media, YouTube, Advertisements, Trends. Gillette's commercial on "toxic masculinity" (Gillette/via YouTube) Plenty. Toxic masculinity is not at all barbecuing, having a beard, playing sport, hunting, fishing or even laddish humor. Procter & Gamble was the first one that thought the answer was sparking an internet firestorm, which they did with a commercial that addresses "toxic masculinity": The Cincinnati-based consumer products giant created the video for its Gillette razor products and, since its release in mid-January on YouTube, the ad has been seen nearly 30. Egard Watch Company video counters Gillette’s “Toxic Masculinity” ad Comments Legal Insurrection Website Posted by Leslie Eastman Egard Watch Company video counters Gillette’s “Toxic Masculinity” ad Tuesday, January 22, 2019 at 9:00am Due to overwhelmingly positive response, Egard must now back-order stock & is donating to charity for veterans. Procter & Gamble Co. The #MeToo movement. Some men are angry after razor brand Gillette's latest ad discussed themes of toxic masculinity, sexual assault and the #MeToo movement. Some experts say it was a strategic move meant to appeal to millennials. But research supports the idea that "toxic masculinity" is, in fact, detrimental to the mental and physical health of boys and men. Gillette's latest ad has people either up in arms or jumping with joy. But Gillette’s ad, while noteworthy, is far from the first ad campaign to deal not only with deeply ingrained societal issues, but also with toxic masculinity specifically. (Joshua Paladino, Liberty Headlines) Procter & Gamble announced Tuesday that it wrote down Gillette, its shaving supply brand, by $8 billion. The ad could have been considered even more insulting than the first. Toxic Masculinity is a Myth Toxic Masculinity is a Myth By Christine Flowers Last week, shaving-supply company Gillette released a controversial ad reminding guys of their "toxic masculinity," a phrase that has popped up to describe the supposed hazards of typically male behavior. But the Newtown Fire Station has told SBS News the sign wasn't a response to the Gillette ad, but a statement against toxic masculinity. When the company released its. We know it’s up to men to change their behavior, but women have been saying that for generations. Gillette’s new advert, which challenges toxic masculinity and sexual harassment, has prompted angry reactions from men’s rights activists. In the ad, the razor brand calls out “bullying,” “sexual harassment” and “toxic masculinity,” and questions: “Is this the best a man can get?”. What we discover can be disturbing and. READER POLL: Which Is A Bigger Crisis – Open Borders or “Climate Change”?. The advert takes Gillette’s longtime slogan, “The Best a Man Can Get” and turns it into “The. The #MeToo movement. We Believe: The Best Men Can Be | Gillette (Short Film) www. It relates to the issue known as the “pink tax. Because toxic masculinity is a huge social issue, that negatively affects both men and women. Browse Toxic masculinity news, research and analysis from The Conversation After the #me-too inspired Gillette ad, a male therapist says this year's Super Bowl ads were disappointingly mild. This is neither a "we hate men" campaign nor is this an attack on masculinity. Dan Munro April 5, 2019 Masculinity, Nice Guy, YouTube 0 Comments. Gillette's provocative new ad encouraging men to fight toxic masculinity has sparked a backlash. Skip trial 1 month free. Gillette's New "Toxic Masculinity" ad-is "toxic masculinity" a real problem or is this just toxic political correctness? Guests are welcome to read the forum, but to gain full access to its features please register your free account with us. The ad, "entitled We Believe, begins with a compilation of actions commonly associated with 'toxic masculinity,'" a press release stated. They likely need them. But the commercial acts as if men don't already stand up to toxic guys or have disdain towards toxic men. Over 4 million people have already viewed "We Believe: The Best Men Can Be" a new Gillette marketing video which takes on "toxic masculinity" and his been. Gillette, a classic brand for men’s grooming products, takes on the social discussion around toxic masculinity in its newest commercial and short film. Troubling images flash by: A boy running from a mob of. This week, Gillette officially called off its war against “toxic masculinity” after an unprecedented backlash to its controversial ad resulted in an $8 billion write-down for parent company. To say the right thing, to. A new ad campaign from Procter & Gamble-owned razor brand Gillette is taking on toxic masculinity and calling on men to take action against sexual harassment and bullying. Gillette advert: New ad tackles toxic masculinity - but people are vowing to BOYCOTT brand GILLETTE'S NEW advert has been met with mixed reviews, after the razor brand launched a campaign to. That’s loosely tied to the Procter & Gamble brand’s (once?) popular line of razors and razor blades. Some men are angry after razor brand Gillette's latest ad discussed themes of toxic masculinity, sexual assault and the #MeToo movement. The Gillette advertisement, recently released via social media in advance of the big game, tackles a variety of issues associated with toxic masculinity, ranging from sexual harassment, bullying and even violence. The ad, which has racked up. For the past 30 years, Gillette. Bian: Gillette ad about toxic masculinity was more than necessary. Richardson: Gillette's ad on masculinity is better late than never Every year, I work with students to explore how gender is constructed through advertising. It addresses the casual dismissal of such toxic chauvinism with the. Jan 17, 2019 · Gillette commercial controversy: Men should just get over it and adapt to #MeToo era. Watch: Gillette takes on toxic masculinity in new ad for the #MeToo era The campaign, which asks men to "shave their toxic masculinity", has generated debate and sparked backlash from several. " That somehow men being men, and boys being boys is a bad thing. Following their much maligned 'toxic masculinity' ad, Gillette has become one of the weakest performing Proctor & Gamble products, with sales continuing to decline. ” “I think masculinity can be beautiful,” he said. Posted on January 17. In Gillette's new video, men and boys exhibit violent, boorish and bullying behavior. So it has come to the point in our collective failure of understanding, our self. Watch the Video below for Paul Joseph Watson’s breakdown of this totally asinine move by Gillette, courtesy of Infowars. The ad subverted the Gillette slogan, this time by making it inclusive of gender identity. Soon after the smug, dog-whistling ad broke, conservatives noticed that as Gillette self-satisfyingly denounced “toxic masculinity,” they were hiding a heap of toxic masculinity commissioned by none other than their own brand. Gillette, the shaving company, debuted a new commercial this week that assails "toxic masculinity" and challenges men to behave better toward women and each other. (Gillette via AP/AP) for Gillette: Should an ad about toxic culture why toxic masculinity is a. Razor brand Gillette says it is "shifting the spotlight from social issues to local heroes" after an ad delving into "toxic masculinity" caused a customer backlash. A new Gillette commercial calling out “toxic masculinity” has sparked both praise for and criticism of the razor company. And a lot of men have taken to social media to lash out at Gillette and the commercial – on YouTube, the spot has. The uproar comes as Gillette battles upstarts like Harry's, Dollar Shave Club and others for millennial dollars. Gillette takes its ‘Toxic Masculinity’ ad and runs with it to even more woke heights Posted at 7:07 pm on May 27, 2019 by Brett T. Discussion in 'The War Room' started by Ripskater, Jan 14, 2019. Toxic Masculinity row: What does Gillette shifting focus say about purposeful advertising? Following the controversy over the #MeToo movement-inspired ad in Jan, the brand has shifted its. Toxic masculinity. The ad, which has racked up. Gillette launched a new campaign “thebestmancanbe. The bullied kids need to hear them, so do women, and all the other victims of toxic masculinity. which has nearly 5 million views on YouTube, and toxic masculinity especially, was carefully constructed. Gillette ‘Toxic Masculinity’ Ad Relies on Men Being Bad to Sell Razors If you live on the internet, like I do, you've probably seen Gillette's "#TheBestMenCanBe" video ad by now. Getbig Bodybuilding, Figure and Fitness Forums > Getbig Main Boards > Gossip & Opinions (Moderators: Max_Rep, Princess L, Ron, Mr. The problem is in how the ad was made that was reeking in racism. Gillette’s infamous “toxic masculinity” ad may cost Procter & Gamble more than anyone imagined in January. ” WSJ: Gillette is embracing the #MeToo movement in a new digital ad campaign aimed at men, the latest message from an advertiser attempting to change societal norms. Skip trial 1 month free. of the ad and. Gillette addresses "toxic masculinity" in a new digital ad campaign aimed at men, the latest message from an advertiser attempting to change societal norms. The #MeToo-inspired campaign famously tackles toxic masculinity by encouraging men to "be the. The problem is not the overt message itself — as men we need to hold up to higher standards. Gillette uses new ad to urge men to get rid of 'toxic masculinity' in #MeToo era 200,000 times on YouTube. no more,” wrote one commenter on Gillette’s YouTube channel. In fact, it joins a. (Photo Credit: Screenshot via YouTube). " Gillette, the Procter & Gamble Co. " That somehow men being men, and boys being boys is a bad thing. Don't get me wrong there's at least one adult black man in the video being toxic but it just feels like he was thrown in after someone brought the issue up. Gillette isn't the. Two weeks ago, Gillette was slammed for releasing a new “toxic masculinity” ad that shamed white men and made it appear that boys are just a bunch of ruthless bullies. Gilette/YouTube Gillette just released a new ad that questions the behavior of men in the #MeToo era, turning their 30-year-old tagline into a question that asks "Is this the best a man can get?". Recently the Gillette Co. Jan 14, 2019 · Proctor & Gamble is urging men to shave their "toxic masculinity" in a new ad for Gillette razors. ‘Batman Shooter’ James Holmes Spotted In Gillette’s Toxic Masculinity Ad By cloverchronicle on January 19, 2019 James Eagan Holmes, the man who killed 12 and injured 70 others at a Century 16 movie theater in Aurora, Colorado in 2012, was supposedly spotted (well, a look-alike) in Gillette’s now infamous toxic masculinity commercial. on YouTube, the spot has garnered 289,000 likes and a whopping 683,000 dislikes. Seriously: if your masculinity is THAT. Procter & Gamble Co. Along with the popularity, came the criticism. January 15, 2019 its YouTube video has more. Picture: YouTube. The ad, entitled ‘We Believe’, was released in January. For those who applaud the commercial, it may appear strange that its seemingly positive message. A new Gillette ad addresses toxic masculinity, particularly as it pertains to bullying, harassment, and the Me Too movement. Gillette's team consulted men across the country, conducted its own studies, and spoke to experts on masculinity, according to the company. “For me, what’s at the heart of it is reducing violence,” said Sollis. “We believe in the best in men. Creative Works. The title is a play on Gillette's famous tagline, "the best a man can get", which has been present in its advertising campaigns for 30 years. Gillette made a risky bet with a new ad referencing the #MeToo movement and questions around toxic masculinity. Toxic masculinity in the spotlight. Advertising Ethics and Social Issues: Gillette’s Close Shave with Toxic Masculinity Gillette took to social media to air their new “We Believe” advertisement in early January of 2019. " outlining the issues of Gillette's ad so today I will discuss an times on Youtube and is. Gillette’s new ad challenging toxic masculinity has got a lot of people talking. Gilette/YouTube Gillette just released a new ad that questions the behavior of men in the #MeToo era, turning their 30-year-old tagline into a question that asks "Is this the best a man can get?". The controversy over Gillette’s new advertisement focused on toxic masculinity highlights the differences between challenging stereotypes of women and men in advertising. However, the ad’s focus on bullying during. "Is this the best a man can get?" asks the narrator of the ad, released Sunday on YouTube and shared Monday on Twitter. Gillette politically charged itself in January when it released a commercial offering a new twist on its "best a man can get slogan" that instantly went viral, in large part for exactly the wrong reasons. In January 2019, Gillette launched the #MeToo "The Best Men Can Be" ad campaign against "toxic masculinity," portraying boys and men as prone to bullying, violence, and sexual harassment — all of which have nothing to do with shaving. Gillette's newest advertisement isn't about shaving, or beards or personal hygiene. A Gillette advert which references bullying, the #MeToo movement and toxic masculinity has split opinion online. The uproar comes as Gillette battles upstarts like Harry's, Dollar Shave Club and others for millennial dollars. pulled the ad from its official YouTube channel and stopped running it on TV. Gillette's New "Toxic Masculinity" ad-is "toxic masculinity" a real problem or is this just toxic political correctness? Guests are welcome to read the forum, but to gain full access to its features please register your free account with us. ” P&G is the company we used to call Proctor and Gamble. Gillette ad (YouTube) "Boys will be boys," a phalanx of grill-manning men repeat over and over in Gillette's new ad calling out "toxic masculinity. Image via Gillette / YouTube Gillette is challenging men to shave their toxic masculinity in their must-see new ad. Stephen Colbert took aim at both Gillette’s toxic masculinity ad that has gone viral and one of its right-leaning critics on Wednesday’s “The Late Show. The ad challenges bullying, sexism, and sexual harassment while attempting to put an end to “toxic masculinity” in the wake of the Me Too Movement. Toxic masculinity is the worst. Gillette has come under fire after. Gillette recently launched a new advertising campaign that tackles the fraught but buzz-worthy issue of toxic masculinity. Gillette’s new ad will trash its sales and be the year’s worst marketing move Gillette’s purpose-driven attempt to revitalise its slogan, ‘The best a man can get’, isn’t just a waste of ad budget but an expensive exercise in destroying its dominant market share. Gillette’s inspiring new ad addressing toxic masculinity asks: “Is this the best a man can get?” it the most disliked video on Youtube. It attempted a quiet, yet blatant, and very lazy walk-back of its toxic masculinity stance by attempting to make a United States soldier out to be a hero. Shortly after the Gillette toxic masculinity ad started trending, I wrote an article on Scary Mommy discussing how, as a father, I found the message incredibly important. That appears to be enough to wake up from #Woke and spin them 180 degrees. However, the ad's focus on bullying during. This was the vision of masculinity depicted in an ad campaign that debuted in January 1989 during Super Bowl XXIII. Toxic masculinity. Gillette ad rebrands masculinity Amid #MeToo, razor maker says men can be better Toxic masculinity. Following their much maligned ‘toxic masculinity’ ad, Gillette has become one of the weakest performing Proctor & Gamble products, with sales continuing to decline. Jan 17, 2019 · Gillette commercial controversy: Men should just get over it and adapt to #MeToo era. I also think that as we deconstruct toxic masculinity we need more teaching, and discussion on what regular masculinity looks like. Gillette's Ad Against 'Toxic Masculinity' Triggers Online Backlash Gillette recently released a two-minute commercial that had almost nothing to do with razors and shaving cream. Part 2 - Gillette Ad Targets Toxic Masculinity - Duration: 4:25. Dan Munro April 5, 2019 Masculinity, Nice Guy, YouTube 0 Comments. Gillette's provocative new ad encouraging men to fight toxic masculinity has sparked a backlash. The video starts with an old Gillette ad that shows a woman kissing a man's face and says, "The best a man can get. The company’s nicely-recognised slogan, “The best a guy can get,” was tweaked into a dilemma, “Is this the finest a male can get?”. We forget that the best brands have values and personalities and, most of all, that there are people behind the brand…and that the brand is those people. No cable box required. The ad shows men fighting, cooking barbecue, and verbally harassing women, interspersed with news reports about the #MeToo movement. The advert takes Gillette’s longtime slogan, “The Best a Man Can Get” and turns it into “The. Unfortunately, most of them seem to be angry dudes attacking Gillette for challenging them to be “The Best Men Can Be,” and using the ad as an excuse to call other men “soy boys,” cucks, sissies, pansies and f. Furthermore, Gillette’s use of buzzwords such as “toxic masculinity” that tie politics to methods of marketing make the ad’s intention quite blatant: to generate revenue. New Gillette takes on “toxic masculinity” with a #MeToo edge Rafael Jan 19, 2019 26 Comments A new Gillette ad is challenging toxic masculinity in the wake of #MeToo, with a razor sharp cultural commentary that has already gone viral. " WSJ: Gillette is embracing the #MeToo movement in a new digital ad campaign aimed at men, the latest message from an advertiser attempting to change societal norms. ” The nearly two-minute ad, titled “We Believe,” doesn’t focus on. A campaign committed to protesting "bullying," "toxic masculinity" and "sexual harassment. From this ad, it is clear where the people shaping the Gillette brand are planting their flag (at least in this instance): against toxic masculinity. Back in January, the brand released an ad that, at its heart, just asked men to be good—to reject the toxicity of a. Post hoc ergo propter hoc?. But as the comments on YouTube show, a significant portion of Gillette’s target market is unhappy that Gillette put liberal ideology ahead of taking a real stand against sexual assault and sexual harassment. I shared that article on my blog Facebook page, and then spent the next 24 hours fielding insults that basically confirmed just how prevalent toxic. The video challenges the axiom "boys will be boys," and asks boys and men to instead strive to be "the best men can get. For three decades, Gillette promised its customers “The Best a Man Can Get. The Gillette ad includes a clip of Terry Crews testifying before Congress about the rights of sexual assault abuse survivors after he accused a high-profile. Gillette's latest ad has people either up in arms or jumping with joy. Seriously: if your masculinity is THAT. Toxic Masculinity is a Myth Toxic Masculinity is a Myth By Christine Flowers Last week, shaving-supply company Gillette released a controversial ad reminding guys of their "toxic masculinity," a phrase that has popped up to describe the supposed hazards of typically male behavior. GIllette takes a deep look at modern masculinity. with rival brand Gillette's We show what "toxic masculinity" looks. However, the ad's focus on bullying during. A rape victim directs a Gillette commercial to shame all men and try to sell them razors at the same time. Gillette, a classic brand for men’s grooming products, takes on the social discussion around toxic masculinity in its newest commercial and short film. 1) To amalgamate all the issues of violence/social transgressions to masculinity or 'toxic masculinity' is simplistic, and to reduce it to one gender is just trying to put the working class against one another (men versus women), period. The Gillette ad includes a clip of Terry Crews. " Gillette, the Procter & Gamble Co. The ad not only created a firestorm of controversy online, but it also helped cost the company billions of dollars. In contrast to "We Believe", the advertisement was generally praised for its acknowledgement of the transgender community, though it received far fewer views because Gillette did not upload it to YouTube and Twitter. People are trashing their razors to protest Gillette's controversial ad about toxic masculinity. ” WSJ: Gillette is embracing the #MeToo movement in a new digital ad campaign aimed at men, the latest message from an advertiser attempting to change societal norms. Gillette made a risky bet with a new ad referencing the #MeToo movement and questions around toxic masculinity. Jan 16, 2019 · What makes this ad so offensive is that Gillette doesn't just condemn bad behavior, something most men do as well. (Joshua Paladino, Liberty Headlines) Procter & Gamble announced Tuesday that it wrote down Gillette, its shaving supply brand, by $8 billion. Gillette uses new ad to urge men to get rid of 'toxic masculinity' in #MeToo era 200,000 times on YouTube. Men are just as affected by toxic masculine as women. A Gillette ad for men invoking the #MeToo movement is sparking intense online backlash, with accusations that it talks down to men and groups calling for a boycott. The ad seems to be addressing toxic behavior AND toxic masculinity at the same time as if they are both the same issue, maybe that's why people got upset? I don't know. Plenty of the responses are sexist and racist, with dozens complaining that the ad makes white men in particular look bad and arguing that, basically, there is no such thing as “toxic masculinity,” but rather a tragic lack of. Despite the backlash to Gillette’s controversial “toxic masculinity” ad, experts say the brand is tackling social issues in a smart way. Gillette should certainly be lauded for their efforts to alter men's behavior, but can this type of ad bring. Gillette is facing serious backlash one day after debuting its "We Believe" ad campaign combating "toxic masculinity. On one side, the campaign is being praised for tackling masculine stereotypes and. Review updated: Jan 22, 2019. The short film, circulated on YouTube. We need to preserve the good in masculinity. To say the right thing, to. In order for Gillette to make an advert like this for women, there would first need to be a female equivalent and it would need to be as prevalent as toxic masculinity. Although they didn't publicly admit that the change in their policies is caused by the backlash from their toxic masculinity ad, it's obvious they are afraid their losses would grow if they don't change their way and that's still good to hear. Re: Gillette preaching against "toxic masculinity" Holy shit, you dudes triggered by a lame ass commercial are pretty pathetic. Gillette is embracing the #MeToo movement in a new digital ad campaign aimed at men, the latest message from an advertiser attempting to change societal norms. 14, the online-only ad has garnered millions of views on YouTube, a level of buzz and chatter that any brand would covet. P&G Challenges Men to Shave Their ‘Toxic Masculinity’ in Gillette Ad. Gillette talks toxic masculinity and #MeToo in controversial advert On YouTube and Twitter, angry men do more that we can get closer to our best," says the ad. We need men to hold other men accountable. In this case, Gillette Razors recently released a very preachy, serious, and tone-deaf ad which was going after men for our supposed toxic masculinity. No cable box required. (Gillette via AP/AP) for Gillette: Should an ad about toxic culture why toxic masculinity is a. The company's "We Believe" ad weighs in on topics like toxic masculinity, sexual harassment, and the #MeToo movement. And the model of toxic masculinity is passed on from man to boy to father to son to uncle to nephew ad infinitum. Gillette's newest advertisement isn't about shaving, or beards or personal hygiene. Razor brand Gillette says it is “shifting the spotlight from social issues to local heroes” after an ad delving into “toxic masculinity” caused a customer backlash. Morgan tweeted : ‘I’ve used @Gillette razors my entire adult life but this absurd virtue-signalling PC guff may drive me away to a company less eager to fuel the current pathetic global assault on. The #MeToo movement. In January of 2019, Gillette released its now infamous ad for razors called "We Believe: The Best Men Can Be. The new Gillette commercial, which alternates between echoing glib feminist talking points and bashing men, is hugely unpopular on YouTube, receiving over 40,000 thumbs down compared to less than 6,000 thumbs up. Gillette's new 'toxic masculinity' ad has company losing lifetime customers in droves Gillette's new ad also contains brief footage from the radically far-left YouTube talk show "The. wants men to contemplate their own “toxic masculinity” before using their products going forward. Gillette’s new ad called, “We Believe The Best Men Can Be”, encourages men to rethink the way they raise their own sons. " In the ad, the razor brand — a subsidiary of global giant Proctor. Bill Goodykoontz. Gilette/YouTube. "You know, for a company like Gillette to open up a commercial with a term like 'toxic masculinity,' I just don't feel like masculinity is toxic. The numbers on YouTube are very telling. Not sure why Gillette felt it necessary to make such an ad in the first place it seems like they should just stick to selling razors. Gillette, the company best known for its disposable razor blade products, recently produced an ad that no one will shut up about that addresses the idea of "toxic masculinity". Conservative corporate activism organization 2nd Vote attributed the write-down to a successful boycott by Americans upset over Gillette's "toxic masculinity" advertisement that aired during the 2019 Super Bowl. Gillette's Ad Against 'Toxic Masculinity' Triggers Online Backlash Gillette recently released a two-minute commercial that had almost nothing to do with razors and shaving cream. Gillette has come under fire after. They decided to launch a new ad campaign lecturing men about their "toxic masculinity. SermonAudio. the response to the Gillette ad feels like a dam breaking. The scenes that. ‘Batman Shooter’ James Holmes Spotted In Gillette’s Toxic Masculinity Ad By cloverchronicle on January 19, 2019 James Eagan Holmes, the man who killed 12 and injured 70 others at a Century 16 movie theater in Aurora, Colorado in 2012, was supposedly spotted (well, a look-alike) in Gillette’s now infamous toxic masculinity commercial. Gillette 'We Believe' Ad Challenges Toxic Masculinity In #MeToo Era Backlash has many pointing out this is why we need the commercial in the first place. The reaction to Gillette’s toxic masculinity ad has been swift and so far, unforgiving. Gillette’s New Ad Addressing Toxic Masculinity Met With 400,000 Dislikes, Vitriol From YouTube Users By James Loke Hale On January 15, 2019 January 16, 2019. Of the 43 abusive males […]. Procter & Gamble Co. Jan 15, 2019 · The ad was created by AOR Grey, the advertising agency for Gillette, and was directed by Kim Gehrig. Gillette/YouTube. In the wake of backlash Gillette moves from 'toxic masculinity' to local heroes, YouTube, or any. A Gillette ad for men invoking the #MeToo movement is sparking intense online backlash, with accusations that it talks down to men and groups calling for a boycott. You are a little baby crying into a void and your diaper needs changing. It's racist and misandrist. " WSJ: Gillette is embracing the #MeToo movement in a new digital ad campaign aimed at men, the latest message from an advertiser attempting to change societal norms. Ads for men's hygiene products are notoriously 'manly' and tend to depict what society expects a man to be. The ad not only created a firestorm of controversy online, but it also helped cost the company billions of dollars. ) You’re probably not at all wondering who was behind this anti-White, anti-male Gillette ad…. Two weeks ago, Gillette was slammed for releasing a new “toxic masculinity” ad that shamed white men and made it appear that boys are just a bunch of ruthless bullies. ” WSJ: Gillette is embracing the #MeToo movement in a new digital ad campaign aimed at men, the latest message from an advertiser attempting to change societal norms. We Believe: The Best Men Can Be | Gillette (Short Film) www. The #MeToo movement. Gillette just released the ad, titled "We Believe. Viewed more than 23. She said she felt the message of the ad was not to attack traditional masculinity, but to ask men to reflect on long-held societal norms, some of which may be considered “toxic”- including physical and emotional violence. Find out why Close. SALT LAKE CITY — A video ad released Monday by razor brand Gillette that takes on "toxic masculinity" is being called "brave and timely" by some and "an assault on men" by others. By Wednesday, the ad garnered over 13. The new ad from razor brand Gillette pushes men to do better in the wake of #MeToo and cyber-bullying, and the online reactions have been heated. The YouTube commercial from the Egard Watch Company features footage of men in various situations — from fighting fires to hugging children as the firm’s founder Ilan Srulovicz asks “What is a man?”. Yet Gillette's ad, which recognises this drive for change and wants to take positive action, has been met by a major backlash. By early Tuesday, the video had about 223,000 downvotes on YouTube, compared with about 25,000 favourable reactions. Advertising Ethics and Social Issues: Gillette’s Close Shave with Toxic Masculinity Gillette took to social media to air their new “We Believe” advertisement in early January of 2019. ’s new “toxic masculinity” commercial for Gillette razors has racked up 37 million views on social media in just a few days. But through all that noise, there are tons of people responding. The comments under the @Gillette toxic masculinity ad is a living document of how desperately society needs things like the Gillette toxic masculinity ad. You are a complainer. Thegatewaypundit. youtube/Gillette. " The Gillette ad braintrust apparently thought that "we need to do something about this! Let's make a YouTube ad completely derailing our message and alienating our primarily male customer base. libertycadre. Gillette politically charged itself in January when it released a commercial offering a new twist on its "best a man can get slogan" that instantly went viral, in large part for exactly the wrong reasons. Many are praising the clip, while others are threating to boycott the company. ” The Gillette ad braintrust apparently thought that “we need to do something about this! Let’s make a YouTube ad completely derailing our message and alienating our primarily male customer base. ” It was both praised as. "Is this the best a man can get?" asks the narrator of the ad, released Sunday on YouTube and shared Monday on Twitter. The video starts with an old Gillette ad that shows a woman kissing a man's face and says, "The best a man can get. The uproar comes as Gillette battles upstarts like Harry’s, Dollar Shave Club and others for millennial dollars. The point of the ad was to show what women and men go through at the hands of toxic masculinity. 14, the online-only ad has garnered millions of views on YouTube, a level of buzz and chatter that any brand would covet. Following their much maligned ‘toxic masculinity’ ad, Gillette has become one of the weakest performing Proctor & Gamble products, with sales continuing to decline. " In the ad, the razor brand — a subsidiary of global giant Proctor. More hot political commentary: www. Gillette, a company that sells razors, triggered a slew of right wing celebrities on social media yesterday with an advertisement featuring a new take on its old “the best a man can get” slogan. And always clean-shaven. Gillette's controversial new ad tackles toxic masculinity head on. brand that for three decades has used the tagline, "The Best A Man Can Get," is building a new campaign around the #MeToo movement, a risky approach that will be the latest test of how successfully big consumer brands can navigate tricky social movements. working “to. Joel Balsam. "We strive to provide a safe non-toxic work environment. Paul Joseph Watson PrisonPlanet. youtube/Gillette. Gilette's New Ad About Toxic Masculinity Is Both Breathtaking And Much Needed Gillette/YouTube Source: Gillette/YouTube The ad is called "We Believe," and it. working “to. The company said it was tackling “toxic masculinity. It establishes the state of masculinity today. The term “toxic masculinity” is a bit jarring and frames the spot as an accusation aimed at men and manhood in general rather than the. which has nearly 5 million views on YouTube, and toxic masculinity especially, was carefully constructed. More hot political commentary: www. With the way people are carrying on about the latest Gillette ad, anyone would think "toxic masculinity" was a new term coined to shame men. This is a continued attack against God's design and purpose for man. Gillette’s new commercial “toxic masculinity” The ad is stupid, it basically insinuates that most men condone rape, sexual harassment and that only a few of. Former Gillette customer, via YouTube Other former customers announced their switch to another brand. com reports: The ad had 642,000 down votes after its first two days on YouTube. Posted on January 17. 24bn after taking an $8bn write-down on @Gillette This comes after the now-infamous Gillette ad that asked men to "shave their toxic masculinity" prompted a widespread boycott of the shaving business. Gillette advert against 'toxic masculinity' faces backlash for 'attacking men' By. In contrast to "We Believe", the advertisement was generally praised for its acknowledgement of the transgender community, though it received far fewer views because Gillette did not upload it to YouTube and Twitter. BOSTON (CBS) – A new advertisement from razor brand Gillette is taking aim at “toxic masculinity” and urging men to hold each other accountable in the wake of the “Me Too” movement. The fact-checkers, whose work is more and more important for those who prefer facts over lies, police the line between fact and falsehood on a day-to-day basis, and do a great job. Today, my small contribution is to pass along a very good overview that reflects on one of Trump’s favorite overarching falsehoods. Namely: Trump describes an America in which everything was going down the tubes under  Obama, which is why we needed Trump to make America great again. And he claims that this project has come to fruition, with America setting records for prosperity under his leadership and guidance. “Obama bad; Trump good” is pretty much his analysis in all areas and measurement of U.S. activity, especially economically. Even if this were true, it would reflect poorly on Trump’s character, but it has the added problem of being false, a big lie made up of many small ones. Personally, I don’t assume that all economic measurements directly reflect the leadership of whoever occupies the Oval Office, nor am I smart enough to figure out what causes what in the economy. But the idea that presidents get the credit or the blame for the economy during their tenure is a political fact of life. Trump, in his adorable, immodest mendacity, not only claims credit for everything good that happens in the economy, but tells people, literally and specifically, that they have to vote for him even if they hate him, because without his guidance, their 401(k) accounts “will go down the tubes.” That would be offensive even if it were true, but it is utterly false. The stock market has been on a 10-year run of steady gains that began in 2009, the year Barack Obama was inaugurated. But why would anyone care about that? It’s only an unarguable, stubborn fact. Still, speaking of facts, there are so many measurements and indicators of how the economy is doing, that those not committed to an honest investigation can find evidence for whatever they want to believe. Trump and his most committed followers want to believe that everything was terrible under Barack Obama and great under Trump. That’s baloney. Anyone who believes that believes something false. And a series of charts and graphs published Monday in the Washington Post and explained by Economics Correspondent Heather Long provides the data that tells the tale. The details are complicated. Click through to the link above and you’ll learn much. But the overview is pretty simply this: The U.S. economy had a major meltdown in the last year of the George W. Bush presidency. Again, I’m not smart enough to know how much of this was Bush’s “fault.” But he had been in office for six years when the trouble started. So, if it’s ever reasonable to hold a president accountable for the performance of the economy, the timeline is bad for Bush. GDP growth went negative. Job growth fell sharply and then went negative. Median household income shrank. The Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped by more than 5,000 points! U.S. manufacturing output plunged, as did average home values, as did average hourly wages, as did measures of consumer confidence and most other indicators of economic health. (Backup for that is contained in the Post piece I linked to above.) Barack Obama inherited that mess of falling numbers, which continued during his first year in office, 2009, as he put in place policies designed to turn it around. By 2010, Obama’s second year, pretty much all of the negative numbers had turned positive. By the time Obama was up for reelection in 2012, all of them were headed in the right direction, which is certainly among the reasons voters gave him a second term by a solid (not landslide) margin. Basically, all of those good numbers continued throughout the second Obama term. The U.S. GDP, probably the single best measure of how the economy is doing, grew by 2.9 percent in 2015, which was Obama’s seventh year in office and was the best GDP growth number since before the crash of the late Bush years. GDP growth slowed to 1.6 percent in 2016, which may have been among the indicators that supported Trump’s campaign-year argument that everything was going to hell and only he could fix it. During the first year of Trump, GDP growth grew to 2.4 percent, which is decent but not great and anyway, a reasonable person would acknowledge that — to the degree that economic performance is to the credit or blame of the president — the performance in the first year of a new president is a mixture of the old and new policies. In Trump’s second year, 2018, the GDP grew 2.9 percent, equaling Obama’s best year, and so far in 2019, the growth rate has fallen to 2.1 percent, a mediocre number and a decline for which Trump presumably accepts no responsibility and blames either Nancy Pelosi, Ilhan Omar or, if he can swing it, Barack Obama. I suppose it’s natural for a president to want to take credit for everything good that happens on his (or someday her) watch, but not the blame for anything bad. Trump is more blatant about this than most. If we judge by his bad but remarkably steady approval ratings (today, according to the average maintained by 538.com, it’s 41.9 approval/ 53.7 disapproval) the pretty-good economy is not winning him new supporters, nor is his constant exaggeration of his accomplishments costing him many old ones). I already offered it above, but the full Washington Post workup of these numbers, and commentary/explanation by economics correspondent Heather Long, are here. On a related matter, if you care about what used to be called fiscal conservatism, which is the belief that federal debt and deficit matter, here’s a New York Times analysis, based on Congressional Budget Office data, suggesting that the annual budget deficit (that’s the amount the government borrows every year reflecting that amount by which federal spending exceeds revenues) which fell steadily during the Obama years, from a peak of $1.4 trillion at the beginning of the Obama administration, to $585 billion in 2016 (Obama’s last year in office), will be back up to $960 billion this fiscal year, and back over $1 trillion in 2020. (Here’s the New York Times piece detailing those numbers.) Trump is currently floating various tax cuts for the rich and the poor that will presumably worsen those projections, if passed. As the Times piece reported: